Cross-marketing gone horribly wrong

This is what we call in French a cauchemar:

                                                 
I fondly remember the November of my junior year in Paris – learning what all the signs saying “Il est arrivé” meant – that the Beaujolais nouveau had arrived.  Pretty much the cola version of red wine, it went down quite easily.  

But this?  Only for kitsch value, sorry.

h/t Why Travel to France.
                   

A sudden interest in pet product branding . . .

Why are my kids suddenly pondering the potential for confusion between PetSmart and Petco?

Here’s why:
                                            

Meet Reggie.  That’s short for Regina Lampert, Audrey Hepburn’s character in one of our favorite movies, Charade.  There’s a lot more than a new world of branding for me here – so this old dog will be learning some new tricks.  Stay tuned!

Destination: Paris et les jeux de mots

I love wordplay.  I wouldn’t call myself a master, but dilettante? Sure.  So one thing I enjoyed observing in Paris was how the French employ multi-layered and even multilingual wordplay to create product and business names.  This shop was on our way to the bus:

Took me two days to figure it out: Harry Cover?  Well, if you pronounce it with a French accent, it’s haricots verts, or green beans.  Great name for a produce shop, and the figues were delicious.

Then there’s my kids’ favorite non-patisserie snack – Pom’Potes.  Where do I begin?  Well, there’s pomme, which means apple, compote which is the same in English, and pote, which is slang for “pal.”  Put it all together and you get a name that’s cute and catchy.

Not a play on words, but a product name in which my daughters reveled?  Pschitt, a light and refreshing lemon-lime soda.  Click on that link and you’ll see that its makers realize what an entertaining name it is too.

Destination: Paris

I just spent a delightful week in Paris with my parents and daughters, and spent time with old friends and family there too.  Lots of fun brand-spotting, car-spotting, and wining and dining. 

For years I enjoyed coming to Paris and shopping at a store called Jess (no link, it’s not there anymore).  Now, having given my daughters more or less French names, we enjoy spotting souvenir items like keychains bearing their names, and shops with names like “Romeo et Juliet” and the like, in a country where their names are more common than theirs are here in the US. 

However, this one just, shall we say, blew us away:

That’s the sniffer for a perfume called Juliette Has a Gun.  Lovely, no?  According to the website, the English version of which is rather incoherent, several perfumes are planned under the brand.  Miss Charming, for example, is “the perfume of a virgin witch, docile and provocative . . . One instant, holding up the pressures of the world and the next, crying hot tears over the death of Enzo, her bowl fish!”  (I did not make this up.)  Citizen Queen, another of the fragrances, is “not only this edgy lady, or the most glamorous, or the most intimidating, she’s just all that at the same time, a Beauty on her own.” 

I don’t know, when I think of major French perfume houses, I think of “la maison de Guerlain” or “la maison de Dior.”  I just don’t think la maison de Juliette Has a Gun really rolls off the tongue.  Once again, however, I fear I am not the target demographic . . . tant pis alors.

More from Paris tout a l’heure.