See?  I knew the minute I mentioned my InStyle subscription mentioned my InStyle subscription it’d mysteriously terminate.  So now I just have to score the stuff on the street, or at least at Snappy Nails, my salon of choice.  


So what did I find this time?  Mentions of a moisturizer line called CeraVe.  Now there’s a name whose pronunciation stumps me.  Cera, as in Michael, plus “vee”?  Suh-RAVE?  Their website doesn’t provide much insight on the topic, but it does offer contact info for their PR agency, as well as convenient jpg photo files.  Why thank you, don’t mind if I do:



I don’t know, I find their use of SK*INformation to be somewhat twee, a word I just don’t get to use enough.  So I think I’ll stick with Michael Cera, thank you.



Next, I saw an ad for Bodycology skin care products.  Well, once again, it’s a mark that doesn’t move me.  Why?  Because it reminds me of “mycology,” the study of mushrooms.  And I really don’t want anything that suggests mushrooms near my body, sorry.

Apart from InStyle, there’s always People. In one Sandra Bullock-riddled issue I did spot an ad for a product whose name I think bears reconsideration: the Always Infinity sanitary napkin.  Apart from the fact that I think the term “sanitary napkin” has fallen out of usage, I can tell you that the word “infinity” is one I really don’t want to hear in connection with menstruation.

But without InStyle in my mailbox, I’ll just have to rely on my faithful online sources of information.  Jezebel, thankfully, never fails me.  Today they report on a doggie nightclub (yes, I recognize the absurdity) called Fetch.  Ridiculous concept, but the fact that they actually made fetch happen is pretty awesome.  Jezebel also has an outstanding expose on lewd and lurid vodka advertising.  These ads have to be seen to be believed.  

Finally, Nancy Friedman is a never-ending online source of trademark and branding novelties.  Her comprehensive and hilarious account of eye-popping Japantown brand names just makes me hungry for some good ol’ Vermont Curry.


My vet’s parent organization sends us a quarterly magazine on pet health.  This installment has a feature on Cloris Leachman – and mentions her clothing line, A Cloris Line .  The website for the line is currently down; but I wish Cloris all the best and think the name amply rates the Alt-0174 honor!



(As I prefer to think of her . . .)

Pretty much anyone who’s hung out with me over the past nine years knows that I have a bad back.  No, a really bad back – a bulging/degenerated disc at L5/S1 that’s only gotten worse in nine years, with bonus facet joint arthritis. Yippee!  Suffice to say I’ve tried every pain remedy and healing modality and must reiterate that it’s really hard to get into a good strengthening routine when you’re in so much pain you can’t put your socks on.


Sorry for the rant.  So among the pain relief I’ve tried is a nifty little Japanese analgesic patch called SALONPAS:
It actually does minimize the pain somewhat, which in my world these days is a roaring acclamation.  The smell is a bit distracting, kind of like bandages, aspirin and Ben-Gay all rolled into one.  However, what troubles me about the product is the name: I just cannot get over the “np” consonant cluster – I don’t know of another English word that contains it (though I solicit any examples you can offer).  The pronunciation suggested on the Salonpas website’s videos doesn’t convince me: “sa-lone-poss.”  It’s just not a natural pronunciation when it includes the word “salon.”  So I am doomed not just to back pain but also to my inability to get over the spelling of one of my remedies.

Of course, I do live in Colorado, where our choice of remedies includes options not necessarily available elsewhere, if not for my own use (hi again, Dad!), definitely for a future post about medical marijuana outlet naming conventions.

The coincidence of spring break and Passover brought us home to Mt. Kisco, NY for a few days.

(Mt. Kisco town hall on a much sunnier day than when we were there; photo thanks to Google Maps).

While we were there the girls went to their grandma’s hair salon for trims;  next door is a doggie day care called “Reining Cats and Dogs.”  And that was quite an apt name, as the rain was relentless. 

A grand time was nonetheless had by all; best wishes for a happy Pesach.  We will finish the break in New Mexico, thus having covered three “New” states (York, Jersey and Mexico) in one vacation, an accomplishment only a geek could love.