Which is it?

Potatoes for people who can’t read? Or potatoes that can’t read? OR MAYBE they’re hybrid potatoes that don’t have eyes! Yeah, that’s the ticket.
Yes, while Alexia sounds like a pretty name, it actually, according to Merriam-Webster, means “aphasia marked by loss of ability to read.” If it meant something like pus-filled cyst, I’d have a bigger problem with it, but since knowing the real definition doesn’t make me lose my appetite, I’ll give them a pass.

Logo nono

Sometimes graphic designers can muck up the look of a mark. Take this one, for example:




I am reasonably certain that this is meant to be the sunglass version of the regular Xperio lens. Indeed, looking at the company’s website confirms this guess. But something about the squishing of the UV onto the core Xperio mark bothers me. In fact, the website only exacerbates this confusion, as it contains two different logos for the XperioUV mark, and then shows the mark in text as you see in the bottom of the ad above, as two separate words. 

Every trademark lawyer and marketer has a different view, but I think that since “UV” is merely a descriptor to indicate sun protection, why bother making a fancy logo and gluing UV onto Xperio to try to make a new mark? “UV” is generic, and Xperio is so distinctive. Why not merely let UV function as generic, rather than trying to gin up a new trademark with it? It’s just line extension – so you’d have Xperio UV, Xperio Bifocal, Xperio Progressive, Xperio reading, as needed. But no one asked me …

This has been your trip into the mind of a trademark lawyer. Trust me, it’s no easier on this end.



The cruelest Birchbox

Today is my birthday, and April’s Birchbox wastes no time in reminding me that I am old, old, old.

Did I know that there were eight signs of aging hair? Nexxus tells me there are … 
 … yet this packaging neglects to enumerate them. This Youth Renewal rejuvenating hair elixir promises to combat those eight signs, whatever they may be. Although the Nexxus website itself is mute on those signs, consumer reviews indicate great satisfaction with the product, so why not try it? After all, that’s what these samples are for.
The plus-sign or ampersand branding format is one that Nancy has discussed in great detail, and I will defer to her far more comprehensive analysis. The quirk with this product – 
 – Malin+Goetz bergamot body wash, is that “malin” is French slang for clever, crafty, or sneaky. I doubt that was the intent behind the name.
Here’s a Kiehl’s product with two hyphens too many:
Yes, the geeks (and eagle-eyed) among you will note that “Powerful-Strength” and “Clinically-Demonstrated” do not require a hyphen. (See here for more detail on this than I can provide.) What’s more interesting to me is the claim that this product will reduce “Marionette Lines.” WTF? Well, Wikipedia confirms that these are indeed a thing, and a look in the mirror confirms that I do possess these lines, so Kiehl’s here we come.
Speaking of things that are apparently happening, I’ve noticed recently that every major cosmetics company seems to be selling a product dubbed “BB,” for “beauty balm.” Which, in my book, is just another way to say “schmearachs,”* the Yiddishism for anything you schmear on your face. Well, if you liked BB, you’ll LOVE CC:
From Supergoop, a brand we’ve seen before, here’s CC Cream – CC here indicating “color correct,” according to several cosmetics news items. Well, since this one is sunscreen, it’s always welcome here in Colorado (except of course with the April snow showers predicted this week!)
Finally, we have another product marketed for the aging harridan I just saw in the mirror:
Useful, yes, but I have two issues: one, the green is way too close to the green that Garnier uses on its entire line of products (and in which I’d think they could claim protectable trade dress); and two, Simple? Not a very distinctive mark. And simple always makes me think of one of my favorite movies, Tropic Thunder – and its Simple Jack parody. Still, tired eyes? I’ll use it.
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*My best guess as to how to spell this delicious word.

It’s Local!

A great trademark for a new business I found out about while leafing through this month’s 5280 Magazine (great name itself, no?):




That’s Shatter Buggy, if you can’t see my bad photo clearly. What’s their business? I’m so glad you asked, because if you can’t tell from the business’s name, they’ve selected a good mark, in my book. Shatter Buggy fixes your iPad, iPod, or iPhone when you’ve dropped it and cracked the glass – pretty much something I live in fear of doing now that I own two of those three devices. So: great idea, great name.