Too close for comfort

Just got served an ad on Hootsuite for a company called Vormetric. Sorry, but the font I read it in made the beginning of that name waaaaaay too close to “vomit” for my sensitive stomach.

vormetric

Maybe it’s me, maybe it’s late at night, maybe it’s my failing middle-aged vision … but any name that when you squint at it, calls “vomit” to mind? Let’s just say it makes me a bit queasy.

N.B. I also note that my younger teenager returned from her summer adventures with the abbreviated verb “vom” firmly entrenched in her vocabulary, so this could be part of the reason for my strong reaction to this mark.

 

I went back to Ohio

We took our eldest off to Kenyon College this past weekend. Alma mater of such luminaries as Paul Newman, E.L. Doctorow, Laura Hillenbrand, and last night’s Emmy Award winner Alison Janney, it’s a gorgeous campus on a hill in central Ohio – as picturesque an educational environment as you’re likely to find anywhere.

Kenyon’s address is Gambier, Ohio, but Gambier is really inside Kenyon – it’s just that tiny. And because it’s so tiny, commerce there is limited. How limited?

Peoples Bank

There’s just one bank, and it can’t even afford an apostrophe.

 

Suave guava

Those are the only two words that immediately came to mind when I saw this mark:

duavee

I am guessing from the stylization of the word in the lower right-hand corner of the photo that the intention is for the mark to be pronounced “do-a-vee” – and I would have no gripe with that, if the ad didn’t also show the mark in text as “DUAVEE.” It’s that lack of differentiation between the halves of the mark that calls this post’s title words to mind, and makes me want to pronounce it “dwah-vee.”

Still, I’ve seen far worse, and have no quibbles here on the product itself – remember? I’m a femme d’un certain age.

 

Cognitive dissonance

I don’t know about you, but neither of my bubbes ever made mochi:

Bubbies

Bonus points for tortured translation of “ice cream” into French!