Destination: Southern California

Came across this classic sign during our weekend getaway to Orange County:

It struck me that the X+Y formative in branding right now (see Nancy here) is merely an updated version of the “[descriptive]-N-[descriptive]” branding style so popular in the 70s (e.g., Linens-N-Things [founded in 1975]). Somehow I think all the fancy X+Y names would look a lot less snooty if the plus sign or ampersand were replaced with “n” …

Also, the most California thing ever:

 

Comparison beer shopping

I love when I can capture a lesson in trademark distinctiveness in one photo:

On top, you have OMISSION beer. Oh, what a superb name. Authoritative and succinct – and suggestive of the fact that something is missing, though the mark itself doesn’t say exactly what. Instead, it leaves that task to the little box on the upper right-hand corner of the cardboard case: “Crafted to remove gluten.” There we go – now the consumer is aware of a factor vital to its purchase decision.

And then below OMISSION, we have GLÜTINY. Where to begin? Well, I cannot ignore the pointless metal umlaut  (aka röck döts!) that they’ve stuck over the U. Maybe, along with the skull-and-wrenchbones logo, they’re trying to destigmatize gluten-free beer to indicate that metalheads can drink this too? Oy. Then there’s the strange term “GLÜTINY” itself; assuming it’s a homophone for gluten-y, doesn’t that mean it’s gluten-filled or glutinous or gluten-rich? And wouldn’t that then not make any sense whatsoever for a beer that has been “Crafted to remove gluten”? Or wait – is it supposed to rhyme with “mutiny”? Yes, according to the New Belgium website. (And if it’s a gluten mutiny, I see we have yet another #shitmanteau on our hands!) But I still think that if you have what is essentially the word “gluten” in the name of a gluten-free/reduced beer, you are confusing the consumer as to what the product actually contains … as well as whiffing at the opportunity to create a good and distinctive mark.

Set in my ways

I didn’t like “Herban” as a cute play on “urban” eight years ago (see my post here).  Guess what? I still don’t like it, even when the use is more closely connected to “herb” as it is here:

And at least from the outside, there was nothing to suggest why it might be “Denver’s Most Distinctive Dispensary.” However, it may be one of the best dispensary locations in Denver – it’s on the same block as Sweet Action Ice Cream, which I can confirm has some of the best pistachio ice cream this side of Sicily.

 

Rocky Mountain lifestyles

Took a rare trip downtown with the kids on Sunday (suburban life tends to engulf us on the weekends) and they were tickled to see this sign:

Spawn of trademark attorneys that they are, the girls appreciated both the cheap “Come Say High” pun and the suggestiveness of Euflora as a name. Hashtag blessed, as they say.

Destination: Chicago

 

Wandering up and down Michigan Avenue, awaiting my husband’s arrival for his father’s funeral, I managed to find levity (or at least levity sufficient to float my boat, if nobody else’s) in branding at Sur la Table, a store I adore:

baked

As trademarks for baking dishes go, I have to give BAKED a thumbs-down. But Baked Occasions as a cookbook name? BAKED as a mark that is suggestive for Colorado and Washington, and now a few more states? Yeah, that just might work.

 

Rocky Mountain Blah

Okay, I can understand not promoting our cannabis industry too flagrantly in tourism promotions – our appeal shouldn’t be so limited that it repels potential sectors of the market.

But this ad for Colorado tourism?

CO tourism ad

 

Apart from its calling to mind the infamous “Daisy ad” from 1964 (about which here), why does the ad show more of the cloud than of the beautiful blue sky? Why do the mountains fade and lack defined peaks? Why rely on the trite “memory-making” theme? Why couldn’t I photograph the ad without including my thumb? Listen, our never-ending cold spring ended, finally, today. The sun is shining, we may not get rain till later in the day, and people are smiling again after a month’s gloom. This ad captures little of the joy of being in Colorado. And believe me, there’s plenty to be had.

 

 

 

Destination: Aspen

From Aspen Magazine, high society indeed:

High there

Getting in the social responsibility angle? With tasteful graphics and a non-punning name? I’ll be right over – after I’m finished at Bogner and Prada and Gucci, of course.

Rocky Mountain … Rehab?

Apologies for the picture quality – it was yet another of our blindingly sunny days:

It wasn’t until I drove closer to the storefront that I could read what they offered at “The Joint.” Fact is, it’s a good name even for a chiropractic establishment.